Testicular biopsy

Biopsy

 

Testicular biopsy

Testicular biopsy is surgery to remove a piece of tissue from the testicles. The tissue is examined under a microscope.

How the Test is Performed

The biopsy can be done in many ways. The type of biopsy you have depends on the reason for the test. 

The skin over the testicle is cleaned with a germ-killing (antiseptic) medicine. The area around it is covered with a sterile towel. A local anesthetic is given to numb the area.A small surgical cut is made through the skin. A small piece of the testicle tissue is removed. The opening in the testicle is closed with a stich. Another stitch closes the cut in the skin. The procedure is repeated for the other testicle if necessary. 

Needle biopsy is also commonly done. The area is cleaned and local anesthesia is used, just as in the open biopsy. A sample of the testicle is taken using a special needle. The procedure does not require a cut in the skin.Depending on the reason for the test, a needle biopsy may not be possible or recommended.

How the procedure will Feel

There will be a sting when the anesthetic is given. You should only feel pressure or discomfort similar to a pinprick during the biopsy and not pain

Why the testicular biopsy is Performed

The test is most often done to find the cause of male infertility. It is done when a semen analysis suggests that there is absent sperm and other tests have not found the cause. Ispermthus obtained from a testicular biopsy will be used to fertilize a woman’s egg in the lab. This process is called in vitro fertilization.

Normal Results

Sperm development appears normal. No cancerous cells are found.

What Abnormal Results Mean

Abnormal results may mean a problem with sperm or hormone function. Biopsy may be able to find the cause of the problem.

In some cases, the sperm development appears normal in the testicle, but semen analysis shows no sperm or reduced sperm. This may indicate a blockage of the tube through which the sperm travel from the testes to the urethra. This blockage can sometimes be repaired with surgery.

Other causes of abnormal results:

Risks

There is a slight risk for bleeding or infection. The area may be sore for 2 to 3 days after the biopsy. The scrotum may swell or become discolored. This should clear up within a few days.\

Precautions

you will be advised to wear an athletic supporter for several days after the biopsy. In most cases, you will need to avoid sexual activity for 1 to 2 weeks.

Using a cold pack on and off for the first 24 hours may lessen the swelling and discomfort.

Keep the area dry for several days after the procedure.

Continue to avoid using aspirin or medicines that contain aspirin for 1 week after the procedure.